Our 2017 GooseEgg Reliever Rankings Are Here

Marc RzepczynskiSEA202+0.3 Logan VerrettBAL100+0.2 Tom WilhelmsenARI002+0.0 Addison ReedNYM722+0.1 Jandel GustaveHOU010-0.4 MEHS▲▼ Koji UeharaCHC621+0.0 PITCHER▲▼ Robert StephensonCIN010-0.4 Ken GilesHOU210-0.1 Joe BlantonWAS120-0.6 Josh EdginNYM310+0.0 Archie BradleyARI611+0.5 Brad BrachBAL1200+1.9 Hector RondonCHC611+0.4 Scott ObergCOL300+0.4 Brent SuterMIL001+0.0 Trevor RosenthalSTL410+0.1 Juan NicasioPIT221-0.5 Bryan ShawCLE301+0.5 Robbie RossBOS100+0.2 Wade LeBlancPIT100+0.1 Zach BrittonBAL600+0.9 Luke GregersonHOU510+0.4 Will HarrisHOU500+0.8 Cody AllenCLE601+1.0 Brandon KintzlerMIN501+0.8 Aroldis ChapmanNYY500+0.8 Jeurys FamiliaNYM202+0.3 Bruce RondonDET010-0.4 Tyler ClippardNYY112-0.2 GOOSE EGGS▲▼ Boone LoganCLE001+0.0 Blake ParkerLAA431-0.5 Jerry BlevinsNYM503+0.7 Nick VincentSEA200+0.3 Andrew MillerCLE1000+1.6 Dan AltavillaSEA111-0.2 Fernando SalasNYM411+0.1 Wade DavisCHC800+1.0 Wandy PeraltaCIN300+0.4 Edwin DiazSEA611+0.6 Ben TaylorBOS001+0.0 J. P. HowellTOR010-0.4 Rafael MonteroNYM121-0.6 Kyle BarracloughMIA600+0.8 Keone KelaTEX310+0.1 Anthony SwarzakCHW300+0.5 A. J. RamosMIA310+0.0 Tony WatsonPIT601+0.8 Brad HandSD410+0.1 Jhan MarinezMIL110-0.3 Randall DelgadoARI300+0.4 Jared HughesMIL200+0.3 Sean DoolittleOAK412+0.2 Brad ZieglerMIA410+0.1 Chris HatcherLAD110-0.3 Tyler WilsonBAL111-0.2 Chris DevenskiHOU1021+0.8 Joakim SoriaKC611+0.6 Matt BushTEX510+0.4 Brad PeacockHOU101+0.2 Carlos EstevezCOL100+0.1 GOOSE EGGS▲▼ Jacob TurnerWAS300+0.4 Fernando RodneyARI431-0.6 Hunter StricklandSF100+0.1 Joe BiaginiTOR432-0.5 Jose TorresSD010-0.4 Casey FienSEA100+0.2 Chad QuallsCOL100+0.1 Pedro StropCHC203+0.3 Jacob BarnesMIL610+0.4 BROKEN EGGS▲▼ Dustin McGowanMIA201+0.3 Craig KimbrelBOS810+0.9 Brett CecilSTL511+0.3 Justin WilsonDET610+0.6 Robby ScottBOS203+0.3 Jesse ChavezLAA010-0.4 Koda GloverWAS411+0.1 Mark MelanconSF620+0.0 Chase De JongSEA010-0.4 Peter MoylanKC201+0.3 Frankie MontasOAK100+0.2 Jayson AquinoBAL010-0.4 Neftali FelizMIL630-0.3 Matt StrahmKC120-0.6 Roberto OsunaTOR140-1.3 Fernando AbadBOS100+0.2 Josh SmokerNYM412+0.1 Tony CingraniCIN110-0.3 Cam BedrosianLAA303+0.5 TEAM▲▼ Junichi TazawaMIA120-0.6 Kevin QuackenbushSD100+0.1 Adam WarrenNYY001+0.0 Enny RomeroWAS311+0.0 Jim JohnsonATL620+0.0 Erasmo RamirezTB401+0.6 Kelvin HerreraKC410+0.3 Luis AvilanLAD112-0.3 Jose RamirezATL410+0.1 Carlos TorresMIL221-0.5 Steven OkertSF412+0.1 Matthew BowmanSTL620+0.0 Travis WoodKC330-0.6 Jordan LylesCOL110-0.2 Bryan MitchellNYY010-0.4 Alex ClaudioTEX101+0.2 Joely RodriguezPHI503+0.7 GWAR▲▼ James PazosSEA212-0.1 Oliver PerezWAS301+0.4 Ryan TeperaTOR410+0.3 Liam HendriksOAK001+0.0 Alec AsherBAL010-0.4 Carl EdwardsCHC411+0.1 Ryan GartonTB010-0.4 Zach PutnamCHW200+0.3 Josh FieldsLAD101+0.1 Tommy KahnleCHW310+0.1 Michael FelizHOU100+0.2 Ty BlachSF101+0.1 Ryan MadsonOAK210-0.1 Dario AlvarezTEX201+0.3 Evan ScribnerSEA020-0.7 Tony BarnetteTEX320-0.2 Nate JonesCHW410+0.2 Yusmeiro PetitLAA302+0.5 Mike DunnCOL501+0.7 Joe KellyBOS211+0.0 Jean MachiSEA100+0.2 Chris YoungKC100+0.2 Felipe RiveroPIT711+0.6 Dan JenningsCHW002+0.0 Jake McGeeCOL301+0.4 Taylor RogersMIN311+0.1 J. C. RamirezLAA020-0.7 Joaquin BenoitPHI520-0.1 Aaron LoupTOR001+0.0 Danny FarquharTB221-0.4 Kyle RyanDET210-0.1 Ross StriplingLAD431-0.6 Blake WoodCIN010-0.4 Brooks PoundersLAA100+0.2 Kevin SiegristSTL300+0.4 Luis GarciaPHI200+0.3 Justin GrimmCHC101+0.1 David HernandezLAA300+0.5 Tommy HunterTB110-0.2 Alex WilsonDET422-0.1 TEAM▲▼ Heath HembreeBOS113-0.2 Arodys VizcainoATL421-0.2 Santiago CasillaOAK521+0.0 Ryan DullOAK212-0.1 Grant DaytonLAD010-0.4 Nick WittgrenMIA300+0.4 Mike MontgomeryCHC511+0.3 Matt AlbersWAS200+0.3 Antonio BastardoPIT010-0.4 Adam ConleyMIA010-0.4 MEHS▲▼ Mychal GivensBAL712+0.7 Tyler DuffeyMIN210-0.1 Seung-hwan OhSTL602+0.8 Matt BelisleMIN312+0.1 BROKEN EGGS▲▼ Alex ColomeTB721+0.3 Casey LawrenceTOR010-0.4 Dominic LeoneTOR111-0.2 Chris RusinCOL201+0.3 Kenley JansenLAD801+1.0 Hansel RoblesNYM412+0.1 Sam DysonTEX031-1.1 Ryan BuchterSD331-0.8 Darren O’DayBAL321-0.3 Tony ZychSEA210-0.1 GWAR▲▼ Sergio RomoLAD220-0.5 Daniel CoulombeOAK010-0.4 Donnie HartBAL213+0.0 Xavier CedenoTB013-0.4 Alex WoodLAD301+0.4 Matt BarnesBOS402+0.6 Michael LorenzenCIN700+0.9 Corey KnebelMIL812+0.7 George KontosSF321-0.4 Jason GrilliTOR220-0.4 Ian KrolATL110-0.3 Scott AlexanderKC110-0.2 Chase WhitleyTB301+0.5 Dellin BetancesNYY610+0.6 Pedro BaezLAD011-0.4 Austin PruittTB100+0.2 Shane GreeneDET001+0.0 Joe SmithTOR311+0.1 Mike MinorKC320-0.2 Jeanmar GomezPHI311+0.0 Miguel DiazSD010-0.4 Drew StorenCIN110-0.3 Greg HollandCOL1100+1.6 Adam OttavinoCOL832+0.1 Cory GearrinSF010-0.4 Oliver DrakeMIL100+0.1 Bud NorrisLAA530-0.3 Pat NeshekPHI202+0.3 PITCHER▲▼ Kirby YatesLAA010-0.4 Jorge De La RosaARI511+0.3 Shawn KelleyWAS410+0.1 Francisco RodriguezDET232-0.8 Jose LeclercTEX110-0.2 Hector NerisPHI601+0.8 Last month, we introduced a new statistic called the goose egg to measure relief pitchers (The quick-and-dirty version: A pitcher gets a goose egg for each scoreless, clutch relief inning.) Our research revealed that the best relievers of today are much less valuable than the best “firemen” of the 1970s and 1980s, such as Hall of Famer Goose Gossage, who would pitch multiple innings at a time, come in to pitch in tied games, and enter in jams with runners on base — important contributions that the save doesn’t reward, but the goose egg does.But as Ben Lindbergh recently documented over at The Ringer, the hegemony of the save may have loosened just slightly. So far this year, the Cleveland Indians’ Andrew Miller — who might be the American League’s best reliever — has made five appearances that stretched over multiple innings. Miller, who has yet to allow a run on the season, doesn’t have any saves. But he does have 10 goose eggs, tying him for third in baseball. (All statistics in this article are accurate through the end of May 4.)Even more encouraging is the case of the Astros’ Chris Devenski. He has pitched a Gossage-like 18.1 innings over eight appearances so far this year. (In 1975, when Gossage set the single-season record with 82 goose eggs, he pitched 141.2 innings over 62 appearances.) Devenski has only one save, but he has 10 goose eggs. With an exceptional ratio of 34 strikeouts against just two walks on the season, he has grown more comfortable with his multi-inning role. If the Astros keep moving him up their pecking order — Devenski has been used in some high-leverage situations so far, but also some medium-leverage ones — he’ll be a candidate to finish with 50 or even 60 goose eggs. No pitcher has reached the 60 goose-egg benchmark since Scot Shields in 2005. Jose AlvarezLAA322-0.3 Daniel HudsonPIT312+0.0 Andrew ChafinARI011-0.4 Blake TreinenWAS210-0.1 Jeremy JeffressTEX020-0.7 Ryan PresslyMIN120-0.6 David RobertsonCHW510+0.4 Jumbo DiazTB102+0.2 Raisel IglesiasCIN800+1.1 David PhelpsMIA240-1.3 Sammy SolisWAS110-0.3 J. J. HooverARI301+0.4 Deolis GuerraLAA510+0.4 Derek LawSF521-0.1 Miguel SocolovichSTL101+0.1 Brandon MaurerSD510+0.3 Edubray RamosPHI050-1.9 read more

Football Clemson defense presents real challenge for Ohio States run game

OSU freshman running back Mike Weber (25) outruns two MSU players during their game on Nov. 19, 2016 at Spartan Stadium. The Buckeyes won 17-16. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorAll season long, Ohio State has been the team to wear down defenses with the run, supplemented by the veteran passing presence of redshirt junior J.T. Barrett. However, No. 2 Clemson has recently been hitting its stride defending the run, and has a veteran presence that could put the OSU offense to the test.The Buckeyes, ranked No. 3 and in the College Football Playoff for the second time in the playoff’s three-year existence, are averaging 258.3 yards rushing per game this season. The smashmouth style of redshirt freshman running back Mike Weber and the dynamic ability of junior H-back Curtis Samuel has propelled OSU.However, Clemson (12-1) is not the kind of defense the Buckeyes are used to this season. Although OSU had some success running the ball late against Michigan, it took well into the third quarter before the run game woke up after just 41 yards in the first half.The Tigers have given up a little over 132 yards per game on the ground this season, but have limited teams to an average of less than 100 total rushing yards in the last three games. Anchored on the weakside by senior linebacker Ben Boulware, Clemson is a veteran unit that prides themselves in its stifling defense. Weber, after a disappointing 26 yards on 11 carries against the Wolverines, knows that Boulware is the kind of guy who can give he and the rest of the Buckeyes fits.“He’s a fly-around guy,” he said. “Good tackler, good hitter. I didn’t know he was the leader of their defense until Coach Alford told me, but after he told me, you could see it. You could see by his body language by how he plays and how he flies around.”Boulware, who can make plays in the middle of the field as well as on the edges, could be the biggest thorn in the side of Samuel, who depends mostly on outside runs for big gains.Five of Clemson’s starting defenders are upperclassmen, bringing years of experience to a defense that allows an average of just 19.9 points per game. Although the entire season has been a success as a whole, the Tigers have given up quite a few yards and points to anemic offenses such as Troy and Pittsburgh. Even with some outlier performances of defensive lapses, OSU coach Urban Meyer said his team must improve from Michigan on the offensive side of the ball. Two weeks ago, he talked about how the Buckeyes will need to work on not just the passing game, but also the rushing attack.“We’re going to do quite a bit,” Meyer said. “It’s not just passing the ball. We have to protect. We have to do a better job running the ball, too. I think we ran for 200 some yards against our rivals. That’s definitely why we’re going to practice.”Although size doesn’t mean everything in football, a large defensive front can wreak havoc for an offense’s run game. Weber, a predominantly between-the-tackles runner, has more to worry about than just the play-making ability of Boulware.Clemson’s defensive line is led by redshirt senior defensive tackle Carlos Watkins in the middle. Standing at 6-foot-3 and 300 pounds, he is a perfect representation of the massive stature of the Tigers’ defensive line.“Really big guys,” Weber said. “I think their whole defensive line is over 300 pounds. I think they have one guy that’s like 285 or 290. They’re hard to move. Physical. They plug the holes up.”Even with a stout unit facing him before he takes a snap, Barrett is ready for the challenge.In fact, the redshirt junior, who received his degree on Sunday, said he will be looking forward to the first contact to get the ball rolling.“With me, in order to get a little rhythm, or knock the little butterflies you got, run the ball and get hit one time and ‘All right, we’re good,’” he said. “And also, too, just completing a pass, see the ball leave my hands complete to a receiver, I think that’s something else. Either one of those I feel like get me going.”OSU faces Clemson on Dec. 31 at 7 p.m. in Glendale, Arizona, in the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl. read more

PGA Tour rolls into town Players to watch at Memorial Tournament

Jim Furyk: For this veteran, the Memorial Tournament isn’t new. Furyk has fared well so far this year, winning two tournaments already on the PGA Tour, including the Verizon Heritage most recently. Furyk is No. 2 in the FedExCup standings. Although Furyk’s long game isn’t as strong as the other players on the short list of favorites, his solid short game and unflappable demeanor will be crucial if he hopes to contend. Ernie Els: Like Furyk, Els has also taken two titles in his 11 tournaments so far this tour, and he also sits atop the FedExCup rankings at this point. His victories include the World Golf Championship held in California and the Arnold Palmer Invitational. After struggling for the past three seasons, Els has finally hit his stride with five top-10 finishes already this season. With ball-striking at a premium on this difficult Nicklaus-designed course, the long-hitting South African should be in contention come the back nine on Sunday. The PGA Tour makes its stop here in Columbus this week, and the lineup is now official. The Memorial Golf Tournament, to be held at Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, will surely bring in the crowds with its share of big-name golfers.Here are some obvious — and less obvious — players to watch.Tiger Woods: Although Tiger has gotten off to a shaky start since his return to the tour, he is still a favorite to win the Memorial after taking first place last year (his fourth win at Muirfield). Woods is coming off a neck injury, but after committing, it seems his concern isn’t too high. Coming in ranked No. 1 in the world doesn’t hurt either.Jason Day: The 22-year-old is coming off his first PGA Tour victory last week at the HP Byron Nelson Championship. The Australian is relatively new on the scene, so it should be interesting to see if lightning can strike twice for the up-and-coming young golfer.Phil Mickelson: Mickelson had a lack-luster performance at the Colonial, missing the cut after the second round with a three over 73. A tournament victory there would have put him in the No. 1 spot ahead of Woods. Mickelson should be fired up and ready to go, but an absence from the Memorial for the past few years gives him a bit of a disadvantage against the competition. read more

Ohio State womens hockey prepare for first round WCHA series against Minnesota

Freshman forward Katie Matheny (23) prepares for a faceoff during a game against the Toronto Aeros Sept. 28 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost, 2-1.Credit: Chelsea Spears / Asst. multimedia editorFresh off a sweep of then-No. 7 North Dakota, the Ohio State women’s hockey team (14-15-5, 9-14-5) is set to travel to Minnesota Duluth (13-13-6, 11-11-6) for a best-of-three series in the first round of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association playoffs.Coach Nate Handrahan’s team won three straight to end the regular season, finishing fifth in the WCHA for the third consecutive year.But both of the squads the past two years had more wins than this year’s edition, and a lot of that has to do with the first half of their seasons. The Buckeyes went 5-11-2 in their first 18 games, a run that included a stretch of nine games without a win.Assistant coach Carson Duggan said the first half of the season was tough, but once the team came back from its holiday break, things began to change.“The break might’ve come at the right time,” Duggan said. “They were mentally fresh and came back a different group, and it showed in the intensity and execution of practices.”Since the turn of the year, the Buckeyes are 9-4-3 and have swept Penn State, Minnesota State, St. Cloud State and North Dakota in that time.Junior forward Taylor Kuehl, who is one of five Buckeyes with at least 20 points this season, also credited the holiday break as the catalyst for the team’s improvement.“We really struggled at the start of the season,” Kuehl said. “We weren’t pleased with how we started and I think ever since Christmas break, we’ve been a completely different team and we have so much more determination and motivation.”Now with the postseason beginning, the Buckeyes face a familiar foe in Minnesota Duluth. The Bulldogs have been OSU’s first round opponents for the past two years, and OSU leading scorer, senior forward Ally Tarr, said that familiarity gives her team confidence.“We’ve always had a little bit of a rivalry with Duluth,” Tarr said. “They beat us my sophomore year and then last year we beat them, so we know that we can beat them and we know that if we play our best we have a good chance of coming out of there with a victory.”The two teams have played each other four times so far this season, with the Bulldogs winning twice and the other games ending in ties. In the past 10 games in the series, the away team is 8-0-2.But regardless of what statistics say, Duggan said neither team can take anything for granted.“When it comes down to it, you still have to go out and do your job,” Duggan said. “Come playoff hockey, anything can happen.” read more

Morton Salt plant in Inagua still out of operation

first_img Recommended for you Morton Salt operating, Union believes fully by end of November Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #MortonSalt Morton Salt plant in Inagua still out of operationcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 10, 2017 – Inagua – Hurricane Irma may have caused millions of dollars in damage at Morton Salt in Inagua but the details of an assessment are still not available because the process is still underway.   A report in Food Business News revealed that a month after catastrophic Hurricane Irma, the facility is still out of commission according to Paul Jackiewicz, a spokesman for Morton Salt.In this report, which came out on October 3, Jackiewicz said even a timeline was unable to be shared for a reopening of the facility.He said, “We are working actively to mitigate the operational impact as the Inagua facility is one part of our broader production and distribution network.”The company in an earlier report featured in the Chicago Tribune said there was a specialized team on the ground to provide details on the extent of the damage and how it might affect Morton Salt’s overall production in The Bahamas. “…we intend to resume operations there as soon as safely possible.    At Morton Salt, the safety and security of our employees are of the utmost importance, that’s why we closely monitored Hurricane Irma and activated our emergency response plans and protocols in preparation for the storm.”The 300,000 acre facility, where sea water is turned into commercial salt, employs 145 islanders.    #MortonSalt, acquired by German company K+S in 2009, is Inagua’s largest employer, is based in Chicago and produces about a million pounds of salt per year.#MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Changing colours of Holi

first_imgGrowing up in a secular neighbourhood, I always saw Holi as an occasion to celebrate togetherness – ignoring the existing societal barriers, cultural differences, and religious norms. However, time changed everything.Gathering in the community park to splash colours on anyone passing by, singing and dancing to the tunes of holi-centric songs, and binge eating delicacies until the stomach starts to ache, all of it has become a rare sight nowadays. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfLiquor has replaced the traditional Bhaang, and mouthwatering sweets (including Gujiya and jalebi) are avoided out of diet concerns. Overall, the festival of colours has reduced to ‘a day off’ from office. Contemplating the present situation, commoners talk about how the way of celebrating Holi has changed over the years. In search of a better standard of living, many people have migrated from villages to cities – and in the process, self-centralism has become a predominant force. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAccording to various psychological studies, stress levels are also on the rise which has resulted in the decline of patience levels and people tend to be ‘intolerant’ less bothered about others. -Harsh Khanna, Businessman Until a decade ago, we actually used to gather at the community centre of our residential society and celebrate the festival. It used to be hours of celebration with neighbours, relatives, and a thousand friends. But the increasing economic burden on families has forced people to keep the celebrations minimal. Instead of large gatherings, it is just about close friends and relatives. Moreover, urbanisation and rise of nuclear families has further worsen the situation. -Mayank Bhardwaj, Engineer Why just Holi? Look at any festival that we celebrate. We’re more virtually connected to each other now, and the physical connect is almost non-existent. Also, we are no longer interested in nurturing relationships and rather prefer spending ‘me time’ – binge-watching the trending shows. The charm, and spirit of festivals have almost disappeared, and they are losing the real essence. -Akshit Juneja, Entrepreneur I believe the community culture changes after every 100 kilometers. Owing to the different lifestyles and working patterns, way of celebrating an occasion also differs a lot. It was only after I migrated to a metro city that I observed how people in rural areas are more sociable, and stressful lives of city dwellers hampers the festive joy. Having said that, I don’t believe the community culture has completely lost its existence today. It’s still extant. Even today, people like me celebrate the occasion with family, neighbours, and cousins. The only difference that I observe is the amount of enthusiasm and zest, which has dropped down with age. And I believe it is very natural. -Akshay Kumar, Pr Professional I enjoyed Holi celebration more as a kid than I do now. Today, it feels unsafe to step out of the house and roam around the society freely.Earlier the preparations would begin at least a week before – where we would fill buckets with water balloons, stock up colours boxes, look out for the coolest pichkaris in the market, and play for hours without worrying about anything; but things have changed to a great extent. Now, Holi celebration is more of a custom which is mandatorily practiced, but wraps up within a few hours.-Gayatri Mohan, Journalistlast_img read more

Dear Reader It was an abject failure In 2006 af

first_imgDear Reader,It was an abject failure.In 2006, after conquering the US home improvement market, Home Depot (NYSE:HD) ventured into China to claim its share of the Chinese middle class’s exploding growth.It bought 12 stores from local Chinese firm The Home Way, turned them into Home Depots, and waited for voracious middle-class consumers to swarm its aisles, just like they had in the US.But they never came. By 2012, Home Depot had closed its last big box store in China and retreated with its tail between its legs.The business merits of expanding to China seemed ironclad. Hundreds of millions of Chinese people were climbing into the middle class. Homeownership rose from virtually nil 15 years ago to 70% today. Who doesn’t like to personalize their brand-new digs?What Home Depot’s management didn’t understand is that Chinese people aren’t do-it-yourself types. Almost no one in China owned their own home until recently, so furnishing a home was a new concept. They’d never done it before. They needed guidance.Which is exactly why Ikea has been so successful there. The Swedish furniture giant arranges its stores into model rooms that showcase furniture combinations and color schemes. Chinese people love it because it helps them visualize how components fit together to make a complete room.To a home improvement novice, that’s much more useful than the stacks of lumber and 47 varieties of faucets that Home Depot offers. Plus Ikea’s merchandise is easy to buy and put together. No caulk, molding, or power tools necessary. All you need are the instructions, an Allen wrench, and a few hours.Having spent the last two months studying China’s booming smartphone market in search of an investment opportunity for The Casey Report, I appreciate that subtle cultural differences can make or break a company’s bid to transfer its business model to a foreign country. Every smartphone maker wants a piece of China’s huge pie, but the mighty international brands like Apple, Nokia, and LG are struggling to capture it. Tiny upstart Chinese manufacturers, with just a fraction of the resources but a huge advantage in local knowledge, are kicking their butts.I’ll let Adam Crawford, Casey Research technology analyst, elaborate.last_img read more